Category: Jihad in the Caucasus


December 04, 2014

GROZNY, Russia (AP) — A gun battle broke out early Thursday in the capital of Russia’s North Caucasus republic of Chechnya, leaving at least three traffic police officers and six gunmen dead, authorities said. The fighting punctured the patina of stability ensured by years of heavy-handed rule by a Kremlin-appointed leader.

Security officials and the leader of Chechnya said militants traveling in several cars killed three traffic police at a checkpoint in the republic’s capital, Grozny. State news agency RIA-Novosti cited an unidentified law enforcement source as saying that five police officers were killed.

More than six hours after fighting broke out, Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov said a multi-story building the militants had occupied in central Grozny had been destroyed by fire and six of the gunmen had been killed.

He later said several other gunmen had been found in a city school and an operation was underway to “liquidate” them, the Interfax news agency reported. There was no indication that any children were in the school in the early morning.

Although unrest is common across the North Caucasus, forceful security measures adopted by Kadyrov have spared Grozny significant violence for several years. That has allowed Russian President Vladimir Putin to claim success in subduing an Islamic insurgency in Chechnya after years of war.

Dmitry Trenin, who heads the Carnegie Moscow Center, wrote in a Twitter post that “the night attack in Grozny looks senseless, except as an attempt to embarrass Putin hours before his annual address to parliament.” Putin, who is to give his state of the nation address on Thursday, already was under pressure to reassure Russians as fears grow over soaring inflation and a plummeting ruble.

An Associated Press reporter saw the building — a publishing house — in flames and heard the sound of heavy-caliber gunfire before dawn, several hours after the unrest erupted. The AP reporter also saw the body of someone in civilian clothing in the street near the publishing house as fighting continued, but it was not clear how and when the person had been killed.

The Moscow-based National Anti-Terrorist Committee, a federal agency, announced that it had imposed a counterterrorism regime on the center of Grozny. This officially allows heightened security measures to be enforced, and typically indicates the imminent use of heavy force to quash unrest.

Life News, a news outlet believed to have links to Russian security services, cited law enforcement officials as saying about 15 people seized three cars late Wednesday in the village of Shalazhi and drove to Grozny, some 50 kilometers (30 miles) away.

Kadyrov said on his Instagram account, which he uses to issue public statements, that the traffic police officers were shot dead as they attempted to stop the cars carrying the gunmen. Kadyrov said the situation was calm and that all essential public services were operating, but he urged Grozny residents to be cautious.

“I ask residents in areas where (security) operations are being carried out to abide by safety measures, and not to go out onto the streets without cause or to go near their windows,” he wrote. “All the talk about the city being under the control of the military is absolutely false.”

In a message posted several hours later, Kadyrov said that six militants were killed in the standoff at the publishing house. “Not one bandit managed to get out. I directly ran the operation myself,” he wrote.

Kadyrov posted a picture showing the lower half of an apparently dead gunman lying beside a rifle, but it was not immediately clear if it showed one of the presumed attackers. The Kavkaz Center website, a mouthpiece for Islamic militant groups operating in Russia’s North Caucasus, carried a link to a video message by an individual claiming responsibility for the attacks. The man in the video claimed to be operating under orders from Chechen Islamist leader Aslan Byutukayev, known to his followers as Emir Khamzat.

The video could not immediately be verified. A few years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Chechnya was plunged into a full-scale war when separatist rebels pursued independence for the republic. The violence was largely confined to that small republic, but rebels ventured into other parts of Russia.

A fragile peace settlement was reached with Moscow until 1999, when an insurgency movement increasingly inspired by radical Islamist ideas reignited the conflict. A military crackdown succeeded by years of aggressive rule by Kadyrov has quietened the region, pushing unrest to neighboring provinces.

Kadyrov has been widely denounced for human rights abuses, including allegations of killing opponents. He has also imposed some Islamic restrictions on the region, including mandatory public headscarves for women.

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December 30, 2013

MOSCOW (AP) — Although there has been no claim of responsibility for the two bombings in Volgograd that killed at least 31 people in less than 24 hours, suspicion quickly fell on Caucasus rebels who have tormented Russia with terrorist attacks for nearly two decades.

The insurgency has its roots in wars fought between separatist Chechen rebels and Russian forces, but it has spread throughout the North Caucasus region, which includes several mostly Muslim republics.

Most assaults have been within the Caucasus, but attackers have occasionally reached far outside the region, including Moscow. Volgograd, which borders the North Caucasus region to the north, was earlier hit by an insurgent suicide bombing that killed six people in October.

A look at the insurgency: THE START A full-scale war in Chechnya with Russian forces began in late 1994. Although the Russians inflicted enormous damage, the separatist rebels fought them to a standstill. In the fall of 1996, the army withdrew.

The violence of the first war was largely confined to that small republic, but rebels ventured into other parts of Russia. In 1995, militants seized hostages at a hospital in the city of Budyonnovsk. At least 129 civilians were killed, many of them as Russian forces seized control of the hospital.

When Russian forces pulled out, Chechnya became de facto independent and fell into lawlessness and near anarchy, becoming a breeding ground for fighters who increasingly took on a specifically Islamist ideology.

In 1999, fighters invaded neighboring Dagestan with the goal of establishing an Islamic caliphate. They were repelled, but the invasion touched off the second war between Russian forces and rebels in Chechnya. Terrorist attacks spread well beyond the region, including the 2002 seizure of a theater in Moscow while a musical was being performed. All 40 rebels and about 130 hostages died after Russian forces pumped narcotic gas into the theater to end the siege.

In 2004, insurgents seized a school in the town of Beslan. Some 380 people died in explosions and shooting as Russian forces tried to take control. A suicide bomber killed 37 people in January 2011 at Moscow’s Domodedovo Airport, the country’s busiest.

STRUCTURE As the insurgency expanded its operations, concentrating on Dagestan as the second Chechen war subsided, it became known as the Caucasus Emirate movement. Since 2007, its leader has been Doku Umarov, formerly the president of the self-proclaimed separatist Chechen Republic of Ichkeria.

The command structure is unclear. With adherents scattered across a large area, much of its activity may be directed by local warlords whose influence is limited to a particular district, some analysts say.

After the Domodedovo bombing, Umarov declared an end to attacks on civilians, but reversed that order in July, urging his men to “do their utmost to derail” the Sochi Olympics, which he described as “satanic dances on the bones of our ancestors.”

EFFORTS TO QUELL Under Kremlin-backed leader Ramzan Kadyrov, Chechnya has quietened. A huge infusion of federal funds has turned parts of ruined Grozny, the capital, into a shiny display of new buildings. But Kadyrov is widely denounced for human rights abuses, including allegations of killing opponents. He has also imposed some Islamic restrictions on the region, including mandatory public headscarves for women.

Dagestan has become the epicenter of the violence, appearing to be effectively out of the central government’s control. Bombings and attacks on police there are near daily occurrence, as are police operations that corner suspected insurgents and almost always end in the rebels’ death.

Attacks also occur less frequently in the republics of Ingushetia, Kabardino-Balkariya and Karachayev-Cherkessiya. In 2010, as concern about the rebellion grew in the run-up to the Sochi Olympics, Russia created a new administrative district encompassing the Caucasus republics to try to coordinate efforts to wipe out the insurgency. The district’s center is the city of Pyatigorsk, where a car bombing near a police station killed three people on Friday.

10 September 2011

A convoy of internal troops of Russian invaders and police minions ran into a Mujahideen ambush during an attempt to carry out a so-called “special operation” in Sergokalinsk district of the Province of Dagestan.

Sources of Russian aggressors reported that the attack had been organized on Saturday morning in the village of Kadyrkent.

The convoy was fired on from grenade launchers, machine guns and automatic rifles. There is also a report of a mine explosion.

According to preliminary data, reported by Russian aggressors, 5 members of the gang “Russian interior ministry troops” were eliminated as a result of the attack, many others were reportedly wounded. According to other data, 3 Russian thugs were killed and 2 others wounded. However, the terrorist gang of the NAC (“national antiterrorist committee”) claimed that 3 Russian commandos and a policeman had been wounded. However, the minions from the “interior ministry of Dagestan” refuted all data on casualties, saying vaguely that “they were pursuing a group of militants.”

It is to be recalled that previous night, police minions were attacked in this district from woodland. It was claimed that nobody had been hurt as a result of the attack.

On Saturday morning, a convoy of “internal forces” and local police minions that went to a forest had also fallen into an ambush.

Department of Monitoring
Kavkaz Center

Source: Kavkaz Center.
Link: http://kavkazcenter.com/eng/content/2011/09/10/15100.shtml.

9 September 2011

UmmaNews published the statistics of combat operations carried out in the CE territory, during the month of Ramadan 1432 (August 1, 2011 to August 29, 2011). Here is the translation of the report. The previous report can be viewed here.

Province of Nokhchicho (aka Chechnya/Ichkeria):
Number of all operations carried out by the Mujahideen – 4
Minions injured – 1
Invaders injured – 2

Province of Ghalghaycho (aka Ingushetia):
Number of all operations carried out by the Mujahideen – 16
Number of major operations carried out by the Mujahideen – 6

1) Ambush on Kadyrov’s minions from “Vostok (East)” Battalion, near Dattykh village, Sunzha district (on August 16, 2011)
2) Elimination of a company commander of the traffic police regiment in Malgobek district, Savarbek Matiyev (on August 18, 2011 – in Sagopshi, Malgobek district)
3) Sniper attack on a checkpoint manned by invaders from “internal troops” near Dattykh village, Sunzha district (on August 21, 2011)
4) Elimination of a member of the Ingush cell of the terrorist gang “Malgobek District FSB “, Magomed Kogirov. (On August 27, 2011)
5) Blasting of a car belonging to officer of Chechen office of the terrorist gang “FSB administration”, Ramzan Dzeitov, in Ordzhonikidzevskaya village, Sunzha district (on August 30, 2011)

Minions killed – 16
Minions injured – 10
Invaders injured – 1
Martyrs (Insha’Allah) – 1

Province of Dagestan:
Number of all operations carried out by the Mujahideen – 60
Number of major operations carried out by the Mujahideen – 12

1) Blasting of a car belonging to the head of Untsukul district puppet administration, Magomed-Gadzhi Tagirov, in Temir-Khan-Shura village (on August 2, 2011)
2) Elimination of a former head of Tlyaratinskiy district puppet administration, Shamil Rasulov in the capital Shamilkala (On August 5, 2011)
3) Blasting of a military column of the 136th motorized infantry brigade in Khebatli village, Tsuntin district. (On afternoon August 8, 2011,)
4) Elimination of the head of “Fire Department # 16” in Baba-Yurt district, captain of “internal troops” Gaydar Gaydarov, near Kurush village (on August 13, 2011)
5) Elimination of the head of “Gazprom Mezhregiongas” security department, Ruslan Kasumov, in Shamilkala (each region has its own Gazprom regional company, i.e “Gazprom Mezhregiongas Chelyabinsk” or “Gazprom Mezhregiongas Krasnodar”, etc) (on August 13, 2011)
6) Elimination of the head of “police special forces” of Udmurtia’s region of Russia, in Botash-Yurt village, Khasavyurt district (on August 15, 2011)
7) Elimination of a police lt. col belonging to the “criminal investigation dept.” of Voskresensky district, Moscow region (on August 15, 2011, in Botash-Yurt – Khasavyurt district, in the same attack as above)
8) Ambush on “special forces of the internal troops”, in Endirey (between August 16-18, 2011)
9) Elimination of a “divisional police inspector” of Sovietsky district of Shamilkala, major Yarakhmed Osmanov, in Shamilkala (on August 16, 2011)
10) Elimination of the chief of staff of “special forces of the internal troops”, lt. col. Ivan Maslov (In the night between August 17-18, 2011 – near Endirey, Khasavyurt district, during a three-day battle near the village)
11) Attack on a building of the terrorist gang “FSB administration” in Derbent city (on August 27, 2011)
12) Attack on traffic police checkpoint in Derbent city (on August 27, 2011)

Minions killed – 24
Minions injured – 42
Invaders killed – 6
Invaders injured – 16
Martyrs (Insha’Allah) – 13

United Province of Kabardino-Balkaria-Karachai:
Number of all operations carried out by the Mujahideen – 13
Number of major operations carried out by the Mujahideen – 3

1) Elimination of a high ranking Russian police officer from Ryazan, lt. col. Igor Sadomskiy (his body was found on August 2, 2011, in the mountainous area between provinces of Ghalghaycho and KBK)
2) Elimination of a senior operative of “Kabardino-Balkaria investigative department”, Aslan Aslanov, in the town of Baksanenok, Baksan district (on August 3, 2011)
3) Elimination of a police captain of “special purpose forces” of Adyghe office of the Russian interior ministry gang (at night between August 16-17, 2011, in Baksan, Mujahid Tamerlan Dyshekov was martyred during the attack)

Minions killed – 2
Invaders killed – 1
Invaders injured – 2
Martyrs (Insha’Allah) – 3

General statistics of Jihadi operations in Caucasus Emirate:
Total of the operations – 93
Total of the enemies of Allah killed – 49
Total of the enemies of Allah injured – 71
Mujahideen Martyrs (Insha’Allah) – 16

Department of Monitoring
Kavkaz Center

Source: Kavkaz Center.
Link: http://kavkazcenter.com/eng/content/2011/09/09/15101.shtml.