Tag Archive: Anatolia Section


February 1, 2018

The Lebanese Prime Minister, Saad Hariri, yesterday called on the Turkish government to support Lebanon on enhancing its security and to invest in the country’s infrastructure renovation.

“I’ve asked the Turkish government to support Lebanon in its two national priorities, including enhancing the capabilities of the army and the security forces, and developing the country’ infrastructure sector,” Hariri said on Twitter.

Hariri noted that he had asked the Ankara “to help in encouraging the country’s private sector to participate in the government’s investment plan.”

“We [Turkish government] expect the private sector to fund a third of our investment plan,” he added.

The Turkish Prime Minister, Binali Yildirim, recently announced that Turkey was willing to boost bilateral relations with Lebanon on a number of issues, a move that Hariri welcomed.

Source: Middle East Monitor.

Link: https://www.middleeastmonitor.com/20180201-lebanon-calls-for-turkeys-support-for-boosting-security-infrastructure/.

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2018-01-24

BERLIN – Berlin and Ankara planned to discuss on Wednesday Turkey’s cross-border offensive against a Kurdish militia in Syria, officials said, amid controversy over German-built tanks being deployed in the conflict.

German ambassador Martin Erdmann and Turkish Defense Minister Nurettin Canikli were to talk about “how the Turkish operation is equipped,” said German foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Adebahr.

The German government has come under domestic pressure after battlefield images appeared to show Turkey deploying German-made Leopard 2 tanks in its offensive to oust Kurdish militants in northern Syria.

The Kurdish Community Group of Germany accused Berlin of “complicity through weapons delivery to the terror state Turkey”.

German conservative lawmaker Norbert Roettgen, who heads the parliamentary committee of foreign affairs, urged Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel to halt further arms deals with Turkey.

“It is completely out of the question for Germany to increase the combat strength of the Leopard tanks in Turkey if the Turkish army is going after the Kurds in northern Syria,” Roettgen told Tagesspiegel daily.

Roettgen, a leading figure in Chancellor Angela Merkel’s CDU party, said weapons deliveries to Turkey should instead “be banned due to the human rights situation and the dismantling of the rule of law in the country.”

Germany’s criticism of the human rights situation in Turkey, particularly after the government’s crackdown following a failed coup in 2016, badly strained ties between the NATO allies.

Relations have started to gradually thaw in recent weeks with the foreign ministers of both countries vowing to mend ties.

But Turkey’s offensive against the Kurdish militia threatens to reverse the rapprochement with Germany, which is home to large ethnic Turkish and Kurdish minorities.

Berlin delivered 354 Leopard 2 tanks to Turkey between 2006 and 2011.

Under the weapons deal sealed in 2005, Ankara is prohibited only from giving or selling the tanks to third parties without prior approval from Berlin, with no other restrictions on how the tanks are used.

– Skirmishes –

Leading Turkish and Kurdish groups in Germany on Wednesday accused each other of “importing” a foreign conflict in the wake of Ankara’s cross-border offensive against a Syrian Kurdish militia.

Skirmishes have erupted between the two groups in Germany since Turkey on Saturday launched its operation “Olive Branch” to oust the US-backed YPG, whom Ankara views as a terror group, from their Afrin enclave in northern Syria.

Three million ethnic Turks live in Germany, the largest diaspora and a legacy of the country’s “guest worker” program of the 1960 and 70s, as well as hundreds of thousands of Kurds.

Germany’s Turkish-dominated Coordination Council of Mosques said the conflict had been used as an excuse to launch a spate of “attacks on Turkish mosque groups” in Europe’s biggest economy.

“The fighting in northern Syria has been taken as an opportunity to incite against Turkish infrastructure and in particular mosques, and to import terror into Germany,” it said in a statement.

At least two mosques of the Turkish-controlled Ditib group were hit in western Germany’s Minden and the eastern city of Leipzig, said the council.

Windows of the buildings were smashed and walls vandalized, said the council, without naming possible suspects.

It also pointed to a brawl that broke out between Kurds and Turkish passengers at Hanover Airport on Monday, which forced police to intervene to separate the two sides.

“We condemn these attacks and call for calm on all sides,” said the council.

The Kurdish Community of Germany, for its part, accused Ditib imams of calling for jihad against the Kurds in Syria.

“The believers are told to pray for a victory of the Turkish army in the war against the Kurds,” the Kurdish group said, deploring the “instrumentalisation of religion and mosques for a war”.

“Mosques, that are partly financed by taxes and donations from citizens in Germany, are praying for glorious victory and death through jihad, the holy war,” added the group’s deputy leader Mehmet Tanriverdi.

Source: Middle East Online.

Link: http://www.middle-east-online.com/english/?id=86911.

January 05, 2018

PARIS (AP) — Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is traveling to Paris for talks with French counterpart Emmanuel Macron, amid protests over press freedom and the deteriorating state of human rights in Turkey.

Erdogan is making his first trip to France since a failed coup in 2016 that was followed by strong repression. Around 50,000 people have been arrested since then and 110,000 others removed from public sector jobs.

About 30 activists of French watchdog Reporters without Borders staged a protest at the Turkish embassy on Friday, holding images journalists jailed in Turkey. Macron is expected to raise the question of press freedom with Erdogan. They are also set to discuss Turkish ties with the European Union as well as the Palestinian issue and the conflict in Syria and Iraq.

2017-12-17

ANKARA – Turkey on Sunday slammed the incoming Austrian government, a coalition between conservatives and the far-right, for “discrimination” after its program contained a pledge that Vienna will not agree to Ankara joining the EU.

The landmark coalition deal, marking the return to power in Austria of the Freedom Party (FPOe), has sparked ripples of concern throughout Europe after a year of successes for far-right movements in Europe.

The chancellor-elect, Sebastian Kurz of the conservative People’s Party (OeVP), already has a deeply-fractious relationship with Ankara due to his staunch opposition to Turkey’s EU bid while serving as foreign minister.

“This baseless and short-sighted statement in the new Austrian government’s program unfortunately confirms concerns about a political trend based on discrimination and marginalization,” the Turkish foreign ministry said in a statement.

Accusing the incoming government of “dishonesty”, it warned that if realized, the program would bring Austria “to the brink of losing Turkey’s friendship” and be met with “the reaction that it deserves”.

Turkey’s decades-long ambition to join the EU has hit the buffers in recent months as the bloc sounded the alarm over the crackdown that followed the 2016 coup bid aimed at ousting President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

While Austria has called for the accession process to be formally halted, this has met with opposition from key EU members, notably Germany.

Meeting Erdogan on his trip to Greece earlier this month — the first by a Turkish president in 65 years — Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras also backed Turkey’s EU bid.

But last month, the EU cut funds destined to Turkey in the 2018 budget, citing doubts about Ankara’s commitment to democracy and human rights in a move supported by German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

Source: Middle East Online.

Link: http://www.middle-east-online.com/english/?id=86461.

2017-12-17

More than 50 Muslim countries, led by Turkey, slammed the US decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital but a failure to back up the rhetoric with concrete action showed the extent of internal rifts, analysts said.

A statement issued in Istanbul after a December 13 emergency summit of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), a body comprising 57 Muslim countries, said members “reject and condemn” the US move.

OIC members invited “all countries to recognize the state of Palestine and East Jerusalem as its occupied capital.”

The summit was called by Turk­ish President Recep Tayyip Erdog­an, whose country holds the rotat­ing OIC presidency and who has been one of the most vocal critics of the US decision. In his speech at the Istanbul meeting, Erdogan called Israel a “terror state” and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas said the United States would no longer be accepted as a mediator in the Israeli-Pales­tinian conflict.

Erdogan’s efforts to produce a unified and strong response to Trump’s plan were only partly successful. While criticism of the United States in the Istanbul decla­ration went beyond what some OIC members had said individually, less than half of OIC members sent their heads of states to the meet­ing.

Key US allies in the region limit­ed their representation in Istanbul to cabinet members. Saudi Arabia, the guardian of the holy cities of Mecca and Medina and host of the OIC headquarters, was represented by its minister of Islamic affairs. Egypt and the United Arab Emir­ates sent their foreign ministers.

Observers said the strong words in the final statement in Istanbul masked a lack of concrete steps. Gonul Tol, director of the Center for Turkish Studies at the Mid­dle East Institute in Washington, pointed out that, while the Istan­bul declaration was a “symbolically important move” that “projected the image of unity” in the Mus­lim world on the Jerusalem issue, there were no consequences. “It was the lowest common denomi­nator. In practical terms, it changes nothing,” Tol said.

Deep divisions in the Muslim camp meant that even a poten­tial withdrawal by the United States from its role in the Middle East would not change much, Tol added. “I don’t see how they could lead a peace process,” she said about countries at the table in Istanbul.

The OIC includes bitter regional rivals Saudi Arabia and Iran as well as war-torn Syria, where several regional powers are vying for in­fluence. Saudi Arabia also leads a quartet of regional powers in con­flict with Qatar, in which Turkey and Iran take Doha’s side.

While Turkish media hailed the Istanbul summit as “historic,” the meeting’s conclusions did not go beyond the affirmation of East Je­rusalem as the capital of the Pales­tinians, a stand already included in the OIC charter. The summit declaration did not include politi­cal or economic steps against Is­rael. Erdogan’s announcement fol­lowing Trump’s declaration that Turkey might break off diplomatic relations with Israel was not men­tioned.

Also, the OIC statement lacked a pledge by members to move em­bassies to East Jerusalem to coun­ter Trump’s decision to build a US embassy in the holy city. Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavu­soglu, the day after the summit, said he was sure embassies would be opened in the eastern part of the city but did not offer a time frame.

The US State Department ac­cused the OIC of prejudging the outcome of Israeli-Palestinian talks by calling the eastern part of Jerusalem the Palestinian capital, while Trump’s announcement did not specify which parts of the city he was referring to. “I think this would be the difference” between the OIC and the United States, State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said after the Is­tanbul meeting. “We are not mak­ing any calls on borders.”

Given the failure of the OIC to come up with specific steps, Israel said it was not worried by the Is­tanbul summit. Israeli Prime Min­ister Binyamin Netanyahu said the Istanbul decisions “fail to im­press us,” while the Times of Israel newspaper wrote that “Erdogan and Abbas bark at Jerusalem but their threats have no bite.”

Some government critics in Turkey agreed. Ertugrul Gunay, a former minister in Erdogan’s cabi­net, said on Twitter that Erdogan should cut all political, military and economic ties if he really viewed Israel as a “terror state.”

The OIC meeting highlighted Erdogan’s anti-Western rhetoric at a time of tension in Turkey’s ties with the United States over Wash­ington’s support for Kurds in Syria and a growing suspicion by US of­ficials concerning Erdogan’s lead­ership.

Trump’s national security ad­viser, H.R. McMaster, was quoted as telling a panel in Washington that NATO member Turkey and Qatar, long accused by critics of being sponsors of the Muslim Brotherhood, were key support­ers of a “radical Islamist ideology.” The Turkish Foreign Ministry said McMaster’s statement was “astonishing, baseless and unac­ceptable.”

Source: Middle East Online.

Link: http://www.middle-east-online.com/english/?id=86457.

2017-10-31

ANKARA – Iraqi government forces on Tuesday took control of the key border crossing with Turkey in the Iraqi Kurdistan region after weeks of tensions between Baghdad and Arbil, the Turkish prime minister said.

The border crossing “has been handed over to the central government” of Iraq, Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim told his ruling party at a televised meeting in Ankara.

He said all controls at the border will now be carried out by Iraqi and Turkish officials on their respective sides.

The Iraqi forces deployed at the Ibrahim Al Khalil crossing alongside Turkish forces with whom they have been carrying out joint exercises over the last weeks, the state-run Anadolu news agency said.

They were to raise the Iraqi national flag and take down the flag of the Kurdish Regional Government (KRG) which had until now controlled the crossing, it said.

The border crossing was closed while the handover was being carried out, leading to long queues, it added. There were no reports of any clashes.

The Kurdish region has found itself increasingly isolated after holding a non-binding independence referendum on September 25 that was opposed not just by Baghdad but also Iran, Turkey and the Kurds’ Western allies.

Turkey, which over the last years had cultivated strong trade ties with the KRG, reacted with fury to the referendum, fearing the move could encourage separatism amongst its own Kurdish minority.

Deemed by many analysts to have severely overplayed his hand by holding the referendum, the KRG’s leader Massud Barzani said at the weekend that he was stepping down.

Source: Middle East Online.

Link: http://www.middle-east-online.com/english/?id=85691.

December 07, 2017

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — The leaders of Greece and Turkey publicly aired their grievances Thursday in a tense news conference as a two-day visit to Athens by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan got off to a rocky start.

The Greek government had expressed hopes that the visit — the first to Greece by a Turkish president in 65 years — would help improve the often-frosty relations between the two neighbors. The NATO allies are divided by a series of decades-old issues, including territorial disputes in the Aegean Sea, and have come to the brink of war three times since the early 1970s.

But from the outset, the discussions focused on disagreements. On the eve of his visit, Erdogan rattled his Greek hosts by telling Greece’s Skai television that the 1923 Treaty of Lausanne should be “updated.” The treaty delineated modern Turkey’s borders and outlines the status of the Muslim minority in Greece and the Greek minority in Turkey, among other issues.

In a visibly testy first meeting with Greek President Prokopis Pavlopoulos, the two engaged in a thinly-veiled verbal spat over the treaty and Greece’s Muslim minority, which Erdogan is to visit Friday.

“This happened in Lausanne, that happened in Lausanne. I get that, but let’s now quickly do what is necessary,” Erdogan told Pavlopoulos. “Many things have changed in 94 years. If we review these, I believe that all the sides will agree that so many things have to (change.)”

The spat continued during Erdogan’s appearance at an unusually candid joint news conference with Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras. The two listed a series of grievances their countries have with each other, including religious and minority rights, the divided island of Cyprus and the case of ten Turkish servicemen who have applied for asylum in Greece following a Turkish government crackdown after a failed coup last year.

“It is very important to strengthen our channels of communication, and this can only happen on the basis of mutual respect,” Tsipras said. The prime minister said the two also discussed tensions in the Aegean Sea, where Greece complains Turkish fighter jets frequently violate its airspace.

“The increasing violations of Greek airspace in the Aegean and particularly the simulated dogfights in the Aegean pose a threat to our relations, and particularly a threat to our pilots,” Tsipras said.

For his part, Erdogan insisted once more that the Lausanne treaty needed to be reviewed, but stressed his country had no territorial claims on its smaller neighbor. On the topic of the Muslim minority in Greece — which the country recognizes only as a religious minority, while Turkey has long pressed for better rights — Tsipras said his government agreed that improvements must be made in their quality of life.

“But issues that concern reforms involving Greek citizens are not an issue of negotiation between countries,” he said. Tsipras noted it was unclear exactly what Erdogan was seeking with his call to update the 1923 treaty.

“The truth is I am a little confused about what he is putting on the table,” he said. Greeks have been aghast at Erdogan’s previous comments over possibly revising the Lausanne treaty, fearing that could harbor territorial claims.

Erdogan and Tsipras also sparred over Cyprus, a Mediterranean island divided since a 1974 Turkish invasion into a Turkish-occupied north and an internationally recognized Greek Cypriot south. Another round of internationally-brokered peace talks to reunify the island failed earlier this year.

“Who left the table? Southern Cyprus did … we want the issue to reach a fair and lasting solution but that is not southern Cyprus’ concern,” Erdogan said. Tsipras retorted: “My dear friend, Mr. President, we must not forget that this issue remains unresolved because 43 years ago there was an illegal invasion and occupation of the northern part of Cyprus.”

Erdogan also raised the issue of Athens having no official mosque, to which Tsipras responded by saying Greece had restored several mosques around the country, including a centuries-old mosque in Athens.

The refugee crisis appeared to be the only issue the two sides did not disagree on, with both noting they had shared a significant burden of the migration flows into the European Union. More than a million people crossed from Turkey through Greece at the height of the crisis.

Later Thursday, several hundred leftist, anarchist and Kurdish protesters held a peaceful march through Athens against Erdogan’s visit. On Friday, Erdogan will visit the northeastern town of Komotini to meet with members of Greece’s Muslim minority.

Suzan Fraser in Ankara, Turkey, Derek Gatopoulos and Nicholas Paphitis in Athens contributed.

Tuesday, 28 November, 2017

Saudi-based Acwa Power has announced the launch of the $1-billion Kirikkale Combined Cycle Power Plant in Turkey which has a 1,000 MW capacity, enough to meet three percent of the country’s total electricity demand.

The project was officially launched at a major ceremony held at the Presidential Complex in the presence of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Berat Albayrak, the Minister of Energy and Natural Resources besides other senior officials.

It is located in the municipality of Kiliclar in the Yahsihan District, 15km from Kirikkale City Center and 50km east of Ankara.

“The inauguration of this project is a clear sign of the growth and modernization in Turkey, which is making the country set for continued development,” Acwa Power Chairman Mohammad Abunayyan said.

The plant is the first and largest of Saudi energy investments in Turkey’s power sector. Abunayyan said that it stressed Acwa Power’s role in boosting Saudi foreign investment base in the economic, strategic and investment sectors, in line with requirements of Saudi Vision 2030 and its objectives.

“We applaud the Turkish authorities on delivering a key infrastructure project to drive the economy forward for future generations,” he added.

For his part, Managing Director at ACWA Power Thamer al-Sharhan said that achieving this significant milestone has only been possible through the support extended by various institutes, including Energy Ministry, Regulator (EPDK), TEIAS, Kirikkale Governor and Municipality.

“This project is an ideal example of the power of public-private partnerships in fulfilling national ambitions,” Sharhan said.

Notably, the Kırıkkale Power Plant will provide a steady and reliable energy to Turkey’s national grid.

The project is also among the top three most efficient combined cycle gas power plants in Turkey, significantly contributing to the country’s economy through savings in gas consumption.

Source: Asharq al-Awsat.

Link: https://aawsat.com/english/home/article/1097416/saudi-arabia%E2%80%99s-acwa-power-inaugurates-1bn-power-plant-turkey.

2017-11-19

A new nationalist party in Turkey could become a serious political chal­lenge for President Re­cep Tayyip Erdogan as voters complain about a slowing economy and rising corruption.

Erdogan’s ruling Justice and De­velopment Party (AKP) is facing lo­cal and parliamentary elections in 2019. That year also includes a pres­idential election that will decide whether Erdogan can obtain his goal of becoming head of state with full executive powers. While polls show that the AKP, in power since 2002, remains Turkey’s strongest political force, the creation of a new party could thwart Erdogan’s ambi­tions.

The Good Party, led by former Interior Minister Meral Aksener, is scoring well in opinion surveys, suggesting it could draw disgrun­tled right-wing voters from the AKP and the Nationalist Movement Party (MHP).

As one of the few prominent women in Turkey’s male-dominat­ed political scene, Aksener joined the center-right True Path Party (DYP) and served in the cabinet as interior minister (1996-97) before switching to the MHP.

Now she has launched her own organization, which has become the source of much speculation in Turkey. A survey by the Gezici poll­ing firm has Aksener’s Good Party at nearly 20% of the vote, a result that, if true on Election Day, would make it the third strongest group in Turkey’s parliament and that could end the AKP’s domination of the chamber.

The Good Party enters the stage at a time many Turkish voters are looking for alternatives, pollster Murat Gezici said. “One-in-three AKP voters think Turkey needs a new party,” he said, referring to the results of his latest survey.

The poll also indicated that a ma­jority of MHP voters said they want a new political movement and that Aksener could be a serious chal­lenger to Erdogan in the presiden­tial election in two years. The sur­vey results suggested support for Aksener could keep Erdogan to less than 50% of the votes cast in the first round of the election and could force the president to face her in a second round.

Aksener, who studied history be­fore going into politics, is not hiding her ambition. When the audience at the launch of the Good Party on October 25 called her “prime min­ister” in celebratory chants, she re­sponded by saying that she would be president.

The Good Party is a staunchly right-wing group competing with the AKP and the MHP for conservative voters and could profit from growing skepticism towards the rul­ing party.

“We don’t know much about the new party but Aksener sure is bet­ter than Tayyip,” Rahfet, an Istanbul taxi driver who would only give his first name, said in reference to Er­dogan. “There is corruption every­where.”

Erdogan, in power since becom­ing prime minister in 2003 and pres­ident in 2014, is Turkey’s most pow­erful leader since Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, who founded the republic almost a century ago. Turkey en­joyed an unprecedented economic boom under Erdogan and the AKP but a wave of persecutions of sus­pected enemies of the state since a failed coup in 2016 led to com­plaints of a repressive atmosphere in the country.

Turkey’s relations with tradition­al partners in Europe and the Unit­ed States are strained. At the same time, inflation has risen to 12% and unemployment is at 10% overall, with one-in-five younger Turks out of work.

In a sign of the rising political discontent, almost half of Turkish voters rejected Erdogan’s plans for an executive presidency in a refer­endum this year. Results showed that voters in the country’s biggest cities had turned against him. The president responded with a purge of local officials that included forced resignations of the AKP mayors of Istanbul and Ankara.

Aksener told delegates at the founding ceremony of her party that Turkey was suffering from a “dysfunctional opposition and a political structure that is no longer democratic.” She accused Erdogan and the AKP of using the judiciary for political ends and said the coun­try was “tired” of the current gov­ernment.

That sentiment is shared by Turks who are concerned that the country is on the wrong track. Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim recently had to defend himself after the publication of documents of the so-called Paradise Papers revealed that his family had investments in Malta that could be used to evade Turkish taxes. The opposition called for an investigation.

Gezici’s poll found that approximately 12% of AKP supporters and more than 22% of MHP voters might go for Aksener’s party in the next election. If that holds in the elec­tion, the MHP, an AKP ally, could drop below the 10% threshold that a Turkish party needs to cross to win seats in parliament.

MHP leader Devlet Bahceli called for an abolition of the 10% condi­tion, a move seen by many as an in­direct admission that the MHP sees its support waning.

Thomas Seibert is an Arab Weekly contributor in Istanbul.

Source: Middle East Online.

Link: http://www.middle-east-online.com/english/?id=86007.

NOVEMBER 13, 2017

ANKARA/SOCHI (Reuters) – Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan took swipes at U.S. and Russian interventions in Syria on Monday and said if countries truly believed a military solution was impossible, they should withdraw their troops.

Russian President Vladimir Putin and his U.S. counterpart Donald Trump said in a joint statement on Saturday they would continue to fight against Islamic State in Syria, while agreeing that there was no military solution to the country’s wider, six-year-old conflict.

”I am having trouble understanding these comments,“ Erdogan told reporters before flying to Russia for talks with Putin. ”If a military solution is out of the question, then those who say this should pull their troops out.

“Then a political method should be sought in Syria, ways to head into elections should be examined… We will discuss these with Putin,” he said.

After more than four hours of talks with Putin in the southern Russian resort of Sochi, Erdogan said the two leaders had agreed to focus on a political solution to the conflict.

“We agreed that the grounds to focus on a political solution (in Syria) have been formed,” he said.

Putin said Russia would continue to work on Syria with Turkey and their efforts were yielding results: “The level of violence has definitely been reduced, favorable conditions are being created for the progression of a inter-Syrian dialogue.”

Neither leader went into more specific detail. Asked if the two discussed Erdogan’s earlier comments, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said the talks were about more complex issues which could not be made public, according to RIA news agency.

Turkey has been annoyed by both Russian and U.S. missions in Syria. Before his trip to Russia, Erdogan said both Moscow, which backs President Bashar al-Assad, and Washington, which armed Syrian YPG Kurdish forces Ankara sees as allied to separatists fighting in southeastern Turkey, had set up bases.

“The United States said it would completely leave Iraq, but it didn‘t. The world is not stupid, some realities are being told differently and practiced differently,” he said.

He said the United States had 13 bases in Syria and Russia had five. The YPG has said Washington has established seven military bases in areas of northern Syria. The U.S.-led coalition says it does not discuss the location of its forces.

Russia has been a strong supporter of Assad, whose removal Erdogan has demanded, and Moscow’s military intervention two years ago helped turn the conflict in the Syrian president’s favor.

Turkish troops have also fought in Syria to halt the advance of Kurdish YPG forces along its frontier.

“We attach great importance to the joint steps Turkey and Russia will take on (the) defense industry,” Erdogan said.

Source: Reuters.

Link: http://www.reuters.com/article/us-mideast-crisis-turkey-russia/erdogan-swipes-at-russia-u-s-missions-in-syria-idUSKBN1DD1F2.